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Memento Mori: The Positive Power of Thinking About Dying


Memento Mori is a Latin phrase that translates to "remember that you must die."

A favourite of Stoic philosophy, it’s a reminder of the inescapability of death. It’s not intended to be morbid—rather to clarify, illuminate, and inspire. A reminder of the precious nature of time.

The general idea of recognizing your mortality has been around for millennia.

The phrase itself is believed to have originated in the Roman Empire. After military victories, the heroes were paraded through the streets on chariots. They may have felt like Gods...

But the Romans would place a person in the chariot whose sole responsibility was to whisper in the hero's ear throughout the parade: "Respice post te. Hominem te esse memento. Memento mori!" Translation: "Look behind. Remember you are mortal. Remember that you must die!"

Humans are inclined to hide from our mortality—to push it away from our minds. And this logic needs no explanation—the uncertainty and finality of death can range from unsettling to paralyzing. Marcus Aurelius and other Stoic philosophers taught the opposite. Bring death to the front of your mind. Let your mortality serve to clarify your daily motivations. Let your mortality inspire you.

Beyond the exact phrase, the idea of remembering our mortality has been a constant across time, culture, and religion. Death and time are the ultimate equalizers. We may look different, live in different places, and believe different things. But in the end, we’re all the same. So as you face the coming days, weeks, months, and years of your life, always remember your own mortality. Remember how precious your time really is. Don’t hide from it. Embrace it. Let it motivate and inspire you. Let it be a call to action.

The purpose of “memento mori” is not to carry a dark cloud above one’s head, but to compel one to lead a rich life of purpose, perspective, and deeper relationships.

“You could leave life right now. Let that determine what you do and say and think.” - Marcus Aurelius


Meditate on Death

It sounds so counterintuitive to want to focus on your own mortality. However, for many, meditating on their own mortality is often a helpful reminder to live. “Reminder to live? How could I forget?”


Though many don’t feel like they need a reminder to live, the concept has been used to remind countless individuals throughout history and into today that their lives are often shorter than they think—using this motivation for meaningful action. Some use the symbolism “memento mori” not only as a reminder of death, but also to stop wasting time dreading the future, agonizing over the past, procrastinating in the pursuit of their goals, or holding grudges against others.

We’ve designed the Memento Mori coin using the most powerful symbols that are used to describe and understand death. These symbols reveal insights into death’s meaning.

The skull- death being a symbol of the skull makes sense, literally. When a person’s body decays, the skull is left behind. For centuries, burial techniques left bodies more vulnerable to earth’s elements, and as a result, skulls were readily visible in graveyards and other places.

The clock and the hourglass are regarded as a symbol of death because both measure the time we have left on earth. It is a symbol of mortality. Time symbolizes the cycle of life in every way.

Candles can be associated with mourning, remembering and death. Candles can be used in both religious and cultural rituals, such as lighting a candle for the deceased to reduce the gap between the living and the dead.

The Memento Mori challenge coin was created for everyday carry and is a very special reminder coin, which serve as daily reminder to make the absolute best of our time as we never know when our time here on earth expires.

A challenge coin is the ultimate carry and go tool, with a reminder in your pocket to make the very best of each day.


We make edc coins with powerful sayings as everyday carry reminders. They remind you to choose action over distraction so you can embrace challenges and navigate one day at a time. In business and life, quotes are short bits of wit and wisdom that are easy to revisit when we need them for that little extra motivation.



Memento Mori.

Most people avoid thinking about death and dying as much as possible. And this logic needs no explanation—the uncertainty and finality of death can range from unsettling to paralyzing. While this is true, you will also find that some teaches of ancient philosophy stress the opposite—that there are immense benefits to remembering that one day, you will die.


MEMENTO MORI: REMEMBER, YOU ARE MORTAL

One of the primary meditations of the ancient philosophy of Stoicism is a concept called “memento mori” — which roughly translates in Latin as, “remember that you are mortal.”

The purpose of “memento mori” is not to carry a dark cloud above one’s head, but to compel one to lead a rich life of purpose, perspective, and deeper relationships.

“You could leave life right now. Let that determine what you do and say and think.” - Marcus Aurelius


Why Meditate On Death?

It sounds so counterintuitive to want to focus on your own mortality. However, for many, meditating on their own mortality is often a helpful reminder to live.


“Reminder to live? How could I forget?”


Though many don’t feel like they need a reminder to live, the concept has been used to remind countless individuals throughout history and into today that their lives are often shorter than they think—using this motivation for meaningful action. Some use the symbolism “memento mori” not only as a reminder of death, but also to stop wasting time dreading the future, agonizing over the past, procrastinating in the pursuit of their goals, or holding grudges against others.




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